Recent Changes

Thursday, August 11

Monday, December 13

Sunday, December 12

  1. page Evidence-Based Interventions edited ... {Using Teacher Praise and Opportunities....pdf} Partin, T., Robertson, R., Maggin, D., Olive…
    ...
    {Using Teacher Praise and Opportunities....pdf}
    Partin, T., Robertson, R., Maggin, D., Oliver, R., & Wehby, J. (2010). Using Teacher Praise and Opportunities to Respond to Promote Appropriate Student Behavior. Preventing School Failure, 54(3), 172-178. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.
    ~Taeja
    An evidence-based intervention, self-monitoring, is discussed. The author discusses several types of self-management systems including self-monitoring, goal setting, and self-instruction, among others. The population of students for which the strategies were designed is discussed as well as the benefits of using self-management techniques for both the student and teacher. Finally, the author presents step-by-step instructions for implementing self-management techniques within the classroom.
    {Step by Step.pdf}
    Rafferty, L. (2010). Step-by-Step: Teaching Students to Self-Monitor. TEACHING Exceptional Children,43(2-), 50-58. Retrieved from ERIC database.
    ~Taeja
    (view changes)
    7:33 pm
  2. page Evidence-Based Interventions edited ... http://www.usu.edu/teachall/text/behavior/LRBIpdfs/Functional.pdf Rebekah This article disc…
    ...
    http://www.usu.edu/teachall/text/behavior/LRBIpdfs/Functional.pdf
    Rebekah
    This article discusses two evidence-based interventions, teacher praise and opportunities to respond. The author discusses the two strategies, as research has shown that both strategies “increase appropriate student behaviors and decrease inappropriate behaviors” (Moore, Robertson, Maggin, Oliver, & Wheby, 2010, p. 173). Teacher praise, particularly praise that is specific and contingent on appropriate behaviors is a simple and cost-effective method to help in working on student behaviors. Opportunities to respond, or increased opportunities to respond, allow students more opportunities to come into contact with teacher praise. Strategies to increase teacher praise and opportunities to respond are discussed including teacher self-monitoring of verbal praise and use of individual response cards to elicit responses from all students more frequently.
    {Using Teacher Praise and Opportunities....pdf}
    Partin, T., Robertson, R., Maggin, D., Oliver, R., & Wehby, J. (2010). Using Teacher Praise and Opportunities to Respond to Promote Appropriate Student Behavior. Preventing School Failure, 54(3), 172-178. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.

    An evidence-based intervention, self-monitoring, is discussed. The author discusses several types of self-management systems including self-monitoring, goal setting, and self-instruction, among others. The population of students for which the strategies were designed is discussed as well as the benefits of using self-management techniques for both the student and teacher. Finally, the author presents step-by-step instructions for implementing self-management techniques within the classroom.
    {Step by Step.pdf}
    
    Rafferty, L. (2010). Step-by-Step: Teaching Students to Self-Monitor. TEACHING Exceptional Children,43(2-), 50-58. Retrieved from ERIC database.
    (view changes)
    7:32 pm
  3. page Evidence-Based Interventions edited BIST BIST (Behavior Intervention Support Team) BIST BIST is a ... all students. …

    BIST
    BIST (Behavior Intervention Support Team)
    BIST

    BIST
    is a
    ...
    all students.
    This

    This
    article discussed
    ...
    as parents.
    If

    If
    I were
    ...
    their actions.
    http://www.bist.org/index.html
    Tiffany
    ...
    http://www.usu.edu/teachall/text/behavior/LRBIpdfs/Functional.pdf
    Rebekah
    An evidence-based intervention, self-monitoring, is discussed. The author discusses several types of self-management systems including self-monitoring, goal setting, and self-instruction, among others. The population of students for which the strategies were designed is discussed as well as the benefits of using self-management techniques for both the student and teacher. Finally, the author presents step-by-step instructions for implementing self-management techniques within the classroom.
    {Step by Step.pdf}
    
    Rafferty, L. (2010). Step-by-Step: Teaching Students to Self-Monitor. TEACHING Exceptional Children,43(2-), 50-58. Retrieved from ERIC database.

    (view changes)
    7:20 pm
  4. file Step by Step.pdf uploaded
    7:19 pm
  5. page Tools (Forms, Checklists, Assessments, Rubrics, etc.) edited One tool that I would use in the classroom is a point sheet. This point sheet would have the be…

    One tool that I would use in the classroom is a point sheet. This point sheet would have the behaviors that are expected to be displayed in class. Each time the behavior is displayed the student gets a point. The maximum points students can get in each catorgie is five. The total points they can get for a day is 100.
    90%-100% - $50=panther bucks
    80%-89% -$40=panther bucks
    70%-79% -$30=panther bucks
    60$-69%-$20=panther bucks
    50% and below- $5=panther bucks
    Students will be able to shop at the school store at the end of the day.
    www.pbis.com
    tiffany

    This site provides a power point that discuss the importance of collecting data when starting PBS. The great part of this form is that it shows you how to create charts and graphs using excel. What is great about the information presented is that it shows examples with information that will guide you through the process of collecting base line data and then collecting information after intervention has completed. It guides the user through the process of making graphs and identifying the slopes of line graphs.
    http://www.modelprogram.com/images/IndDataBasedDecMaking.pdf
    (view changes)
    5:38 pm
  6. page Research edited Making Behavior Intervention Planning Decisions in a School wide System of Positive Behavior Su…

    Making Behavior Intervention Planning Decisions in a School wide System of Positive Behavior Support Focus on Exceptional Children, Sep 2003 by Scott, Terrance M .
    Early identification and intervention have been implemented effectively at the school wide level through systems of positive behavior support (PBS). PBS is a proactive, systemic, and data-based application of science with a value-based focus on behavior change and quality of life (see Carr et al., 2002; Sugai et al., 2000). Defined by multilevel systems of prevention and support, each level of PBS is more focused and intensive than the previous level. The school wide level focuses on primary prevention by monitoring and preventing problem behaviors for all students in the school. The next level is secondary prevention which utilizes strategies that are aimed at preventing failure among students for whom primary prevention efforts have been insufficient to facilitate success. Tertiary prevention, the last level, is directed at preventing crisis and failure across larger life domains and is implemented with the students for whom both primary and secondary prevention strategies have been unsuccessful.
    This article defined PBS and why schools should implement it. It provided statistics about the number of referrals that go to the office, yet nothing is done to assist the student. This article also discussed how teachers can implement PBS in their classrooms without gleaning support from administers. Teachers can give students tokens or fake money for good behavior; there are several different ways to implement PBS in a classroom. Teachers need to keep a record of the data they collect on each student. Tiffany

    This paper published in the 2004 Wisconsin Center of Educational Research describes evidence based interventions. The article was written by two researchers who emphasize the importance of using evidence based interventions in schools. They give a list of reasons for using EBI’s in the school. This article is a great start for those in schools who have just began to use evidence based interventions.
    http://www.wcer.wisc.edu/news/coverStories/evidence_based_interventions.php
    (view changes)
    5:35 pm

More